Random thought: I wonder if steam will ever allow submission of web games


  • Jammer

    Steam itself is a web browser essentially. I imagine at some point they would probably cater to web games that can get through the greenlight process. Given the nature of steam, i think this would still get mostly core gamer type games, not casual type stuff that you have on kongregate and what not. So it would stay true to what it is, but also give the benefit to developers who want to publish for web like that.

    Thoughts? Any rumors?


  • Patron

    Well, that’s technically already possible.

    :P


  • Patron

    That’s a very scary thought. What happens when Steam updates their browser and breaks your heavily-optimized game?


  • Patron

    What happens if Google updates their browser and breaks your heavily-optimized game?


  • Tiger Hat

    @dannagle said:

    That’s a very scary thought. What happens when Steam updates their browser and breaks your heavily-optimized game?

    @Josue said:

    What happens if Google updates their browser and breaks your heavily-optimized game?

    Start consuming large quantities of alcohol? Maybe have a quiet cry? :P


  • Patron

    @Josue said:

    What happens if Google updates their browser and breaks your heavily-optimized game?

    Not using Google’s browser.

    Despite being browser-based, AWL’s (and Lava Blade’s) version of node-webkit has not been updated since it was released. All their heavy optimizations have been maintained.


  • Patron

    Yeah, I’m just saying, as a web dev, you should probably at least try to get used to that kind of thing, you know.


  • Jammer

    Or heck, i think it was nvidia that put out a driver update for the witcher 3. broke a lot of OpenGL games apparently. These kind of things can happen anywhere.


  • Jammer

    Well, that’s technically already possible.

    My point being it would be listed in the store & for sale like any other game. But maybe using NW js or atom is easier for deploying a game like that. I’m just thinking of the web benefits for games. Dont have to install anything, can browse to it willy nilly, etc.


  • LDG

    It is interesting that the Steam client already has browsing capabilities. Click to play instead of click to download/buy could be a more optimized flow.


  • LDG

    @richtaur I think “click to play” vs “click to download” glosses over the fact that assets for web based games need to be downloaded as well. It’s easy to think of web based games as nearly instant to load because most of them have very, very few assets as compared to modern AAA style games.

    Plenty of smaller, indie games would load pretty quickly. AWL is just under 20MB including all images, audio, and code. On Steam, which includes node-webkit, it’s 75MB. Just for comparison, here are the sizes of other games in my Steam library:

    • Invisible, Inc: 1,200MB
    • Legend of Grimrock 2: 1,131MB
    • Rogue Legacy: 321MB
    • Spelunky: 273MB
    • Shovel Knight: 239MB
    • Tiny Barbarian DX: 218MB

    None of these are huge games, either. e.g. Heroes of the Storm (4.6GB) and World of Warcraft (29.2GB!).

    It’s possible to download some assets asynchronously, while allowing the player to play early content. But that initial download for many games is going to be a decent chunk of waiting.


  • Jammer

    Yeah for sure. My thought was more along the lines if you build something that is on its own site. Where users do benefit from not needing an installer or anything sketchy. But then have the option to publish it to steam to further your reach.


  • LDG

    Based on @dannagle’s data, nwjs is more than twice the size of AWL itself. Leveraging their own client instead could have benefits for Valve: less bandwidth used, shorter wait period for player (which could increase conversions)…

    could be a small win in probably mostly edge cases, but yeah esp not for asset-heavy games etc.


  • Patron

    To an end-user, “streaming” a purchased HTML5 game is about the same as “streaming” a purchased MP3 from the Amazon cloud player. I think it could work. Perhaps Steam could compel you to use localstorage and other techniques so the browser only needs to do one big download.

    It is an interesting idea. Unless there a large number of HTML5 games on Steam, I doubt they’d bother. NWJS is probably considered a “good enough” solution.


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