Jeff Vogel's done with the App Store


  • Tiger Hat


  • LDG

    Really interesting stuff. I don’t know much about the tech side of the various iOS updates, but I wouldn’t be surprised if what he says is true.

    But as it is, sometimes a thing you want to do is too much hassle for the rewards. Part of being in business is recognizing those moments and making ugly choices.

    I suspect that if Spiderweb were making tons of money on iOS he’d be much more apt to play ball with the frequently changing platform requirements. However, as he also mentions, the popular apps on the AppStore these days aren’t the sort of games Spiderweb creates.


  • Tiger Hat

    That’s sad


  • Tiger Hat

    @geoffb I’ve talked to native iOS people at game jams and they said it used to be more of an annoyance in the past (maybe 5+ years ago) like “pfft, an update” but, like Jeff, it’s a legit business concern now “we’re not making any money off this, how much longer do we support it?” and even the possibility of charging users to get updates. Also nobody thought Android was a better alternative :P

    From my own experience, I’ve been delving into Swift on iOS. Admittedly it’s an evolving language but I had to get gigs of updates for Xcode that covered the IDE as well as updates for Swift. Those updates borked a load of tutorials I had bookmarked as they were tied to specific versions and the changes were significant between the updates.


  • Jammer

    Yeah it’s interesting. I opened my 3d game on my phone the other day, and thought that went bust, but it was really a random glitch, couldn’t reproduce it after. I myself have kind of gone more towards desktop focus lately, as it’s where I play games and where I want to go in the long run. So it’s why i’ve kinda switched away from html5 for now. Though if i wanted to make a web game, i’d use it in a second :)


  • LDG

    For games especially, I think leveraging a platform with cross-compilation is the way to go. Games tend to have custom UI and don’t need to look “native” with regards to UI controls and what not. Plus, when there’s a bug in the iOS export it’s Unity’s (or whoever’s) problem! The obvious downside is that you can’t just jump in a fix the bug yourself, but the pros seem to outweigh the cons. Especially when we’re talking about small studios with limited resources.


  • Patron

    You know, we all just should code in x86 assembly…


  • Jammer

    @geoffb said:

    Plus, when there’s a bug in the iOS export it’s Unity’s (or whoever’s) problem! The obvious downside is that you can’t just jump in a fix the bug yourself, but the pros seem to outweigh the cons.

    I think i remember reading recently that this is how drivers get fixed. Ubisoft or activision devs for example, will find a bug, write an ugly hack around it. And let the Nvidia/amd people know. That’s why driver releases often come out around the time major games do.

    There are always going to be certain abstractions you can’t fix yourself.


Log in to reply