Lostcast 109: Monetizogo


  • Tiger Hat

    Another wonderful episode gentlemen :)

    I appreciate the shout outs, and even though I realize it’s silly, they motivate me to continue doing these feedback threads. Now, I too get to be lost in the seas of time.

    Coincidentally I’ve recently been thinking myself about how being smarter may be actually hindering me. I definitely also remember that when I knew none of the rules of software development, and just had a goal, code would fly out of me at a phenomenal rate. (albeit the worst spaghetti mess that anyone ever has seen Im sure). Now that I have a few years of professional software (web) development under my belt I have to think about unit tests, and self documenting functions, and formatting best practices, and design patterns and all that stuff (the list goes on an on). It’s hard to let go and just get back to raw output because there is a reason that all the process and whatnot is important, even though it definitely feels like I’m bogged down. I think the biggest reason is because I’ve been burned so many times (by myself). So many many times I have programmed myself into a corner or tried to pick up an old project and found that it turns out that the code written by past me was actually the frazzled scribblings of a madman, incomprehensible to all but him. So then of course I get bogged down with game engine choices. I could use Phaser because it’s awesome and “easy” and tons of people are cranking out games left and right with it, but then it doesn’t have any module management (aka stinks too much of Richard Davey and not me :) ). I could use Impact or Melon, or Panda, or ThreeJS, or Construct 2, or GameMaker, etc. but they all have this or that thing that my stupid brain throws up a red flag about. So then my brain tells me that I know enough to just write my own engine. But I don’t want to spend my precious time writing a freaking engine, I want to make a game and play it! Anyway, I’m currently pushing through it and trying to use Phaser, but that is my constant battle with my “smart” brain, whereas a long time ago a younger me would have just grabbed whatever worked and make something, however hideous it was under the covers.

    I also am very interested in how to monetize games, and get contracts and the like. I found all of your insight to be very interesting. I am however starting to think again that I am bogging myself down even thinking about that. I agree that in-app payments will require game design, but I think (at least for me / budding game dev) I need to not even think at all about monetization. Just make the game to be fun, get it out there, and get people playing it. If it’s the next flappy bird or minecraft will I kick myself for missing out on a billion dollars? Maybe. But then again, do I kick myself every week that I don’t play the lottery? No. As I think about it now, I think that I don’t envy you (Matt & Geoff) because you are at the point where you really have to think so much about monetization, rather than enjoying the craft and the games. Of course thankfully (hopefully) the biggest key to making money from a game is to have a fun one.


  • LDG

    @Warspawn said:

    Coincidentally I’ve recently been thinking myself about how being smarter may be actually hindering me

    Yeah it definitely can. People have a tendency to overcomplicate things. Sometimes the task is “change this lightbulb” and us engineerings will go build a robot to do it for us… by the time we’re done we could change a hundred lightbulbs a minute, but it’s been so long that the task is now “change this LASER bulb” or something else incompatible.

    If it’s the next flappy bird or minecraft will I kick myself for missing out on a billion dollars? Maybe.

    There’s really no scenario where you’d ever kick yourself for finding success. If you made a free game and it took off, you could always capitalize on that later. And hey if you had initially put a price on it, odds are it never woulda taken off in the first place. No regrets!

    I don’t envy you (Matt & Geoff)

    haha we get that a lot ;)


  • Patron

    Thanks for answering my logo question. I actually did not know that was a sundial and did not notice the X in the shadow. I thought the logo looked like an axe hitting a decorative pizza stone.


  • Tiger Hat

    @dannagle said:

    I thought the logo looked like an axe hitting a decorative pizza stone.

    Domino’s makes it’s decorative pizza stones out of dough, I didn’t even need an axe it just fell apart in my hands, bloody ripoff.

    Hey @richtaur if you want to force simplicity/vector style in the next logo design as you were discussing in the podcast, it’ll be a good opportunity to crack open your copy of Adobe Illustrator again and give vector art a try again.


  • LDG

    @dannagle said:

    Thanks for answering my logo question. I actually did not know that was a sundial and did not notice the X in the shadow. I thought the logo looked like an axe hitting a decorative pizza stone.

    hahaha! Yeah it’s deliberately subtle, although probably too cryptic… just like AWL!


  • LDG

    @Affordable_Desk said:

    Hey @richtaur if you want to force simplicity/vector style in the next logo design as you were discussing in the podcast, it’ll be a good opportunity to crack open your copy of Adobe Illustrator again and give vector art a try again.

    Fore sure! With AI I’m probably right around “somewhat better than incompetent”. I actually sometimes import sketches into AI to finish the lines (like with this dude). But these days I use Lazy Nezumi for that, so I haven’t touched it in months. Vectors are awesome, def a necessary arsenal in the ol’ toolkit. Someday I hope to crack that logo, should be fun


  • Tiger Hat

    Gonna try Phaser - got to try something, anything, to get my projects off the ground!

    Great 'cast guys :)


  • Patron

    Oh man… I’m soooo late on the whole cast thing…

    Anyways…

    So, you probably don’t have as much experience on this topic as, say, Photonstorm but…
    How does game sponsoring/licencing work in general? (for HTML5 games, that is)


  • LDG

    oh I thought we covered that stuff on the show. Do you have any specific questions?


  • Patron

    @richtaur said:

    oh I thought we covered that stuff on the show.

    Yes, you did mention it (you’re not getting mad yet), but you didn’t say any specifics, like what you did with Humble and Itch.

    What I wanna know is: “Ok, I now I have some idea of how sponsoring works and how much can you make with it, but… where do I go from know?”

    Sure, there’s MarketJS and FGL now accepts Unity and HTML5 games, but, it is still not at par with the Flash game licence market.

    I could as well just PM Tom Fulp to see if hes interested, but…

    Sponsoring seems like the most interesting way to monetize HTML5 games for me, as I don’t have to worry about creating an audience/traffic. Also, US$500,00 is a heck lot of money, in my perspective.

    Guess I gotta make a game first… :P


  • LDG

    @Josue said:

    @richtaur said:
    you didn’t say any specifics, like what you did with Humble and Itch.

    We’ve done nothing with itch.io. With Humble, one just has to email them and it all happens through email. It’s very easy to setup a Humble widget.

    Sure, there’s MarketJS and FGL now accepts Unity and HTML5 games, but, it is still not at par with the Flash game licence market.
    Sponsoring seems like the most interesting way to monetize HTML5 games for me, as I don’t have to worry about creating an audience/traffic. Also, US$500,00 is a heck lot of money, in my perspective.

    That’s all that we’re aware of. There are also “hot” portals that are looking to buy, but finding them can be challenging and is really on you the dev. html5gamedevs.com has enumerated hot portals before, but those lists get inundated pretty quickly. Really the best thing you can do is contact portals, see if they’re active, and try to make friends with them. We’ve met several portal providers IRL and that’s a great way to make them remember you and buy your games. Unless you get lucky, there really isn’t an easy route, it requires making connections and creating a good reputation.

    Guess I gotta make a game first… :P

    Pretty much this yeah. And if you want to go the licensing route, it becomes a quantity game. Basically the faster you can make games, the more money you’ll make.


  • LDG

    also yesterday’s podcast covers some of this stuff more thoroughly :)


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