Things about your language...


  • Patron

    This is for the polyglot LDG community.
    Post jokes, fun facts or just interesting stuff about your language here.


  • Penguin

    In Tagalog, the word “mahal” means either love or expensive.

    Coincidence?


  • Patron

    @Macaronee said:

    In Tagalog, the word “mahal” means either love or expensive.

    Coincidence?

    Haha, I don’t think so… XD


  • Patron

    Corredor (corridor) sound like the junction of “correr” (run) and “dor” (pain).
    Yeah, I’ve hurt myself countless times running in corridors.


  • LDG

    I recently saw resume and thought about how resume doesn’t sound anything like resume. They look identical but sound very different: ree-zoom VS reh-zoom-a.

    (Resume = verb, to begin again OR resume, noun, a personal sellsheet to give potential employers)


  • Patron

    @richtaur said:

    I recently saw resume and thought about how resume doesn’t sound anything like resume. They look identical but sound very different: ree-zoom VS reh-zoom-a.

    (Resume = verb, to begin again OR resume, noun, a personal sellsheet to give potential employers)

    Oh, I didn’t know about that.
    Every time you said “reh-zoom-a” in Lostcast I was like “what is he talking about?” =P


  • Penguin

    @richtaur said:

    I recently saw resume and thought about how resume doesn’t sound anything like resume. They look identical but sound very different: ree-zoom VS reh-zoom-a.

    (Resume = verb, to begin again OR resume, noun, a personal sellsheet to give potential employers)

    This made me think of the episode on 30 rock about the homonyms game show! (even though what you’re saying is totally not the same, but yea, homonyms)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BLaikBRYpfU

    ETA: Soooo, Nerd Geoff just corrected me (and 30 rock, I guess) that those should be called homophones, and what Matt is talking about are homographs, and the original post by Josue are actual homonyms.


  • LDG

    Haha yayyy I love 30 Rock! Treat every week like it’s Shark Week…

    I forgot about that game show, hilarious! Reminds me of Numberwang: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qjOZtWZ56lc


  • Penguin

    @richtaur said:

    Haha yayyy I love 30 Rock! Treat every week like it’s Shark Week…

    Sooo, I said “working on my night cheese” on WoW trade once, and I got crickets. It was so sad.


  • Tiger Hat

    @richtaur said:

    Reminds me of Numberwang: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qjOZtWZ56lc

    You know @richtaur it’s interesting you mention Mitchell and Webb because have you ever actually seen Geoff Blair and David Mitchell in the same room?

    My favourite fake game show was the Adam and Joe classic “Quizzlestick”, it look so old now but it was cutting edge Channel 4 comedy in its day.


  • LDG

    British Blair?! I think you figured him out ;)


  • Patron

    Little intro for people who aren’t @Elite: So, I was talking about Portuguese with Elite on Steam, and he said he thinks Portuguese/Spanish are easier than English…

    So, I started searching for stuff I learned in school but couldn’t remember of, to show how Portuguese is hard. But if I’m going to do all this research, I better show the results to more than one person.

    Let’s start by translating a simple sentence from English to Portuguese:

    I would hurt myself if I did that.

    Now a very simple literal translation:

    I - Eu
    Would - Iria
    Hurt - Machucar
    Myself - Me
    if - Se
    I - Eu
    Did - Fiz
    That - Isso

    So, “Eu iria machucar me se eu fiz isso”, right?

    Of course no (it’s a literal translation after all). First off, if you say that, you’re gonna sound like a portuguese. Brazilians tend to put the pronoun before the verb. Oh, and when it does come after the verb, there needs to be a hyphen between it and the verb.

    But in this case both placements are wrong. There’s a rule which says that, when you’re using the subjunctive mood, the pronoun must go in the middle of the verb.

    But how exactly? This way:

    infinitive verb + pronoun + subjunctive termination

    So, first you join would and the verb together:

    Iria + Machucar = Machucaria

    Now you you put the pronoun between the verb and the “ia”:

    Machucar-me-ia

    Ok, so, now we have “Eu machucar-me-ia se eu fiz isso”.

    There’s another wrong thing here: “Fiz” isn’t conjugated into the subjunctive mode. It should be “fizesse” (agreeing with “me”):

    Eu machucar-me-ia se eu fizesse isso.

    Now, here comes a cool thing: you can just remove the second “eu”!

    The verb already tells me who did the action, so, you can just write:

    Eu machucar-me-ia se fizesse isso.

    Of course, that’s the formal “gramatically correct” form of writing it, but we generally don’t speak like that. Brazilians would say something like this:

    Eu me machucaria se fizesse isso.

    And Portuguese people something like this:

    Eu machucaria-me se fizesse isso.

    That’s the thing I love the most about portuguese, but also one of the things which cause a lot of confusion: Inflection.

    Matthew 7:7 in older translations says something like: “[…]knock, and it shall be opened unto you”.

    So, guess how you write that in Portuguese? Well, it’s in the subjunctive mode, so:

    Batei e abrir-se-vos-á

    Yeah. “Abrir-se-vos-á” means “it will open itself unto you”. I just love that man! You can just joint the auxiliars, pronouns and verb in one thing. So much information condensed!

    But you can’t always do that. Here’s the rule:

    rule

    Colloquially, you can always place the pronoun before the verb, but formally, you should only do that if the verb is in past tense, past continuos, present or participle.

    If it’s in any kind of future tense or in subjunctive, you should put the pronoun in the middle of the verb.

    Otherwise, the pronoun should go after the verb.

    Oh, speaking of participle, did I mention that some verbs have TWO participles?

    For example, saved can be either “salvo” or “salvado”.

    And how do you know which one to use?

    Simple:

    To be - salvo
    Would/have (in the pluperfect) - salvado

    Oh, but, although you can create an additional participle for some verbs, not all of them have two participles.

    Aberto is the only passive participle of open, although “abrido” would also make sense.

    So, how do you know which verbs have two passive participles and which ones don’t?

    Simple:

    absorver absorvido absorto
    aceitar aceitado aceito, aceite
    acender acendido aceso
    afligir afligido aflito
    assentar assentado assente
    benzer benzido bento
    cativar cativado cativo
    cegar cegado cego
    completar completado completo
    convencer convencido convicto
    corrigir corrigido correto
    cultivar cultivado culto
    descalçar descalçado descalço
    dissolver dissolvido dissoluto
    distinguir distinguido distinto
    eleger elegido eleito
    emergir emergido emerso
    entregar entregado entregue
    envolver envolvido envolto
    enxugar enxugado enxuto
    escurecer escurecido escuro
    expressar expressado expresso
    exprimir exprimido expresso
    expulsar expulsado expulso
    extinguir extinguido extinto
    frigir frigido frito
    ganhar ganhado ganho
    gastar gastado gasto
    imergir imergido imerso
    imprimir imprimido impresso
    incorrer incorrido incurso
    inquietar inquietado inquieto
    inserir inserido inserto
    isentar isentado isento
    juntar juntado junto
    libertar libertado liberto
    limpar limpado limpo
    manifestar manifestado manifesto
    matar matado morto
    morrer morrido morto
    nascer nascido nato, nado
    ocultar ocultado oculto
    omitir omitido omisso
    pagar pagado pago
    prender prendido preso
    romper rompido roto
    salvar salvado salvo
    secar secado seco
    soltar soltado solto
    submergir submergido submerso
    suspender suspendido suspenso
    tingir tingido tinto
    vagar vagado vago

    Another cool thing: “caixa” can be either box or cashier.

    But if it’s refering to a box, it’s a female noun, and therefore, the verbs and the pronouns must agree with it.

    But if it’s refering to a cashier, it doesn’t change with the gender of the cashier.

    Other cool thing: using “in the” or “on the” is very common in English. But when these prepositions appear together in Portuguese, you have to join them together.

    Em + a (in the for a female noun) = Na
    Em + o (in the for a male noun) = No
    Em + as (in the for a female noun (plural)) = Nas
    Em + os (in the for a male noun (plural)) = Nos

    And that’s just for “in the”!

    Final cool thing: how do you put a verb in past tense in English?

    If it’s regular, + ed, else, something compĺetely different, right?

    So, check out the verb “do”:

    I did - Eu fiz
    You did - Tu fizestes
    He/she/it did - Ele/ela fez
    we did - Nós fizemos
    you did - Vós fizestes
    they did - Eles fizeram

    And that’s just the perfect past of the indicative mood!

    There are still 12 other moods!


  • Tiger Hat

    @Josue I’m in a pretty subjunctive mood right now…
    Good research tho!


  • Penguin

    I lose my sh*t when people do not use English subjunctive form/tense.

    Also, when @geoffb says “less” when he actually means “fewer.”

    And when my coworkers try to irritate me by saying feeling “nauseous” instead of “nauseated.”

    And when I say “like” every single goddamn sentence.


  • LDG

    Wow, I agree with all that @Macaronee! Especially the “like” part, I never realize how much I say it until I listen to Lostcast ;)



  • @richtaur Res-oo-may has an accent of the second e. It’s actually keyed as resumé (Using the Alt+0233 coding, or the Character Map program on Windows)


  • Patron

    @DrakeFeatherwing said:

    @richtaur Res-oo-may has an accent of the second e. It’s actually keyed as resumé (Using the Alt+0233 coding, or the Character Map program on Windows)

    The acute accent is right before the enter key in the american keyboard, IIRC



  • @Josue said:

    @DrakeFeatherwing said:

    @richtaur Res-oo-may has an accent of the second e. It’s actually keyed as resumé (Using the Alt+0233 coding, or the Character Map program on Windows)

    The acute accent is right before the enter key in the american keyboard, IIRC

    That’s actually the apostrophe, as it doesn’t affix itself over things like the e’ (As evidenced directly to the left). For example, the popular video game Pokémon. Poke’mon just doesn’t have that same feel to it to me. :)


  • Patron

    @DrakeFeatherwing said:

    That’s actually the apostrophe, as it doesn’t affix itself over things

    Huh… That’s weird.

    I tested it on a Macbook (which ship with american keyboards in Brazil), and it worked.

    This, according to Wikipedia, is the US keyboard layout:

    us

    But this is the keyboard Macbooks have:

    us?

    As you can see, what should be a apostrophe/double quote key is actually a acute accent/double quote key.

    If you press a letter followed by it (without pressing the spacebar), it puts a acute accent on top of it. Otherwise, it works as a apostrophe.

    Anyways, don’t have to worry about that with my lovely ABNT2 keyboard:

    haha



  • @Josue Heh, I’ve been a PC boy my entire life, so… XD Still kinda neat. :)


  • Patron

    @DrakeFeatherwing said:

    @Josue Heh, I’ve been a PC boy my entire life, so… XD Still kinda neat. :)

    Yeah, but, @Affordable_Desk said it worked for him, and he is a PC user.

    That key works as an acute accent in all american keyboard PCs I’ve used.


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