New fan here (and suggestions/criticism for the game)


  • Tiger Hat

    Hi there.

    Heard of the game and found it cute. Decided to give it a try and buy it… and so far, I’m not disappointed at all. I’m making it to the crypt consistently (which I assume is probably the last stage) but have yet to defeat Death.

    One thing I like in particular is the ability to actually download & own the game (AKA not Steam-exclusive) on the PC. To me, it was one of the reasons for the purchase and I hope that updates to the game (if any) will be available to those who don’t want to use Steam too.

    Anyway, I got a few suggestions and criticism for the game. Some of it is positive, other not so much. I hope it will help with the game development.

    I love the game atmosphere and I actually find the decision to make the wizard’s tiny lizard familiar the main character to actually be a good idea ; he has a lot more personality than a stereotypical knight type character. I also feel it adds to the main game’s feel and main gimmick ; of course the crypt would be an incredibly hostile and deadly environment when your character is a pet who is used to being fed treats, not fight the undead. Likewise, it fit the mechanic pretty well ; as determination (and an endless supply of swords to throw) is pretty much the only thing he got going for him, him getting back up as a ghost to try and continue his quest out of love and loyalty to his master is kind of cute and really fit the theme.

    Regarding the main areas, they’re actually surprisingly good-looking for a roguelike. A big problem with a lot of roguelikes is that the rooms are often rather boring-looking and samey but the game has a rather nice variety of puzzles and secrets, many exploiting the death mechanic in very good ways. The lack of a time limit and the fact that enemies don’t respawn also really encourage you to explore and take the time to solve all of them, which makes it rather different from most of the roguelikes I’ve played (which is a good thing in my opinion). I was not bothered by the game’s relatively low difficulty by the genre’s standarts because of the amount of secrets. In particular, if you find all of the alternate exits, you can basically double the length of the runs.

    Having persistence between runs is also an excellent point and linking it to the characters you rescue and the blueprints you buy I feel make it feel you are truly progressing between runs. I also applaud the decision to make the weapon arsenal more limited but actually making the weapons different ; in a normal roguelike, even if there are lots of weapons, you ultimately discard your weapons as they become obsolete. I found that in this game, they all have an use of sorts though I think it would have been fun to have more off-key weapons like the bees and the shovel, to really emphasize the main character’s unlikely hero role (namely, that he will use anything as a weapon, even if not designed to be so).

    This is not to say the game is perfect, far from it.

    One of my big problems lies with collision detection with player projectiles. The boomerangs and especially the boom spear are insanely hazardous to use in tight quarters because although your character is clearly fitting in, your projectiles aren’t and hit the wall. This can lead to some cheap deaths and this is a shame because those weapons have an interesting risk-reward mechanic that would otherwise motivate me to use them more often.

    I also was annoyed by a bug in the main menu ; whenever I quit to the main menu and try to restart playing, the game freeze. I have to close the game after quitting to actually play again.

    Although the game is very well-designed, it also suffer from a short length. I assume that the Crypt is the final stage but due to the presence of a sixth stage BGM in the soundtrack, I am not sure. Still, given the Crypt is the final stage, the game is only 3 levels-long, 5 if you find everything. It’s true that some of the stages (in particular the first hidden stage and the final stage) are noticeably large but this cause the game to feel repetitive because of the amount of times you see the same stages before beating the game. I am also disappointed in retrospective that although most of the stages have actually pretty interesting boss fights, the first hidden stage got an enemy rush as a boss fight.

    I may also seem weird but I admit I would have liked if more of the NPCs’ dialogue fleshed out the setting more. I’m okay with not having cutscenes in the main areas / between areas but I expected the villagers’ dialogue to be a bit less… meta, if that make sense. Though I guess the museum compensate in a way (annoyingly enough, there is an error in the game with the key unlocking the way to the second hidden area ; it display an error message instead of the proper description).

    Now for some more exact criticism and by extension, suggestions.

    I really like the idea of alternate paths through the game with the hidden areas. Still, as said above, I feel the game could use more main areas. Regarding the area variety, I found it actually pretty nice ; each area is pretty characteristic in its layout style and obstacles… My real problem lies more with, ironically, the life/death mechanic. Although it’s a brilliant mechanic and probably the best point about the game, I still feel it could have been elaborated upon further. In particular, I think it would have been interesting to create types of floors/obstacles that can only be crossed as alive or dead (for example, warded corridors that can’t be crossed as a ghost or toxic slime-covered floors that would kill a live Raga). Although the light/darkness contrast is a nice thing, I also feel that it would be interesting if the stages changed a bit more when you are dead, especially when you get closer to Death (details and runes that are invisible living become visible or some things change appearance completely).

    Regarding the mechanic itself, I feel it could also affect the game’s structure and narrative ; for example, whenever you exit a stage as alive or dead could result in going to a different stage. I’ve not beaten the game yet so I don’t know if it matters… but I think it would be very interesting if you got different endings varying on if Raga survived his journey or defeated Death as a ghost.

    Graphically, the game is pretty serviceable and for an indie effort, is actually pretty nice. The really strong points are the lighting effects but regarding the smaller details, I feel that it’s a mixed bag. Although I found Raga having an unique animation for laying down on carpets and sleeping to be incredibly cute and I noticed that while Raga smiles when he’s alive, he lose it as a ghost, I found he was unfortunately quite lacking in idle animations. I also feel that his true death animation (die as a ghost) should be different from his live one. He do have a blink if you stop moving but it only come once and it felt weird ; I expected him to have a breathing animation or maybe just blink regularly instead of only once after stopping moving. Regarding monsters, although they animate well, I feel that slight design changes between species variations would have been better than just palette swaps.

    In terms of the audio, I actually have nothing much to say about it. The music so far has been good and the sound effects are pretty nice.

    So yeah… so far, I really enjoy the game as a whole. My only criticism are mostly that I think the game could use extra areas, some bugs ironing out, and I’d like to see the main character being given extra animations.

    Dunno if the devs will read this or what anyone will think of it but well, this is my criticism of the game so far.


  • Patron

    @Mew said:

    Dunno if the devs will read this

    I’m sure they will! :D
    @geoffb @richtaur, please?


  • LDG

    Hi @mew, welcome to the forum!

    Thanks for buying our little game and I’m glad you’re not disappointed! Below are some notes about your feedback:

    One thing I like in particular is the ability to actually download & own the game (AKA not Steam-exclusive) on the PC. To me, it was one of the reasons for the purchase and I hope that updates to the game (if any) will be available to those who don’t want to use Steam too.

    A Wizard’s Lizard will absolutely always be available outside of Steam! DRM-free and not tied to any particular platform.

    Anyway, I got a few suggestions and criticism for the game. Some of it is positive, other not so much. I hope it will help with the game development.

    I love the game atmosphere and I actually find the decision to make the wizard’s tiny lizard familiar the main character to actually be a good idea

    Thanks! This game used to be called Crypt Run and had a generic-looking main character. So we took some extra time to focus on the main character, which resulted in the name change to A Wizard’s Lizard. People seem to really like the little lizard man so it looks like time well spent!

    One of my big problems lies with collision detection with player projectiles

    Sorry about that, collision has been problematic with AWL for some time. @geoffb has fixed most of the collision issues, which we’ll release in an update pretty soon.

    I also was annoyed by a bug in the main menu ; whenever I quit to the main menu and try to restart playing, the game freeze. I have to close the game after quitting to actually play again.

    Oops! That’ll be fixed soon too.

    I am also disappointed in retrospective that although most of the stages have actually pretty interesting boss fights, the first hidden stage got an enemy rush as a boss fight.

    Yeah we had to rush on that dungeon. Fun fact: our Kickstarter budget paid for only 2 dungeons, and we ended up shipping 5 because we couldn’t resist ;)

    there is an error in the game with the key unlocking the way to the second hidden area ; it display an error message instead of the proper description

    Ahh yes I think that’s the one I fixed recently. Should be updated soon.

    I really like the idea of alternate paths through the game with the hidden areas. Still, as said above, I feel the game could use more main areas.

    Definitely hearing you there, we’ll be adding at least an entire new dungeon. This update will come later in the year.

    I think it would be very interesting if you got different endings varying on if Raga survived his journey or defeated Death as a ghost.

    Agreed! The death mechanic hasn’t been explored enough in the current game. We’ll add some new puzzles and pathways accessible via the death mechanic. I’m not sure when this update will be.

    as a ghost, I found he was unfortunately quite lacking in idle animations

    When Raga is a skeleton, he doesn’t have any eyelids ;) I could add another type of idle animation instead, that’s true.

    So yeah… so far, I really enjoy the game as a whole. My only criticism are mostly that I think the game could use extra areas, some bugs ironing out, and I’d like to see the main character being given extra animations.

    Thanks a lot! We’ll be releasing a few updates throughout the year, which should address most of your issues.

    Dunno if the devs will read this or what anyone will think of it but well, this is my criticism of the game so far.

    We read everything :) Thanks for your feedback, it’s really helpful!


  • Tiger Hat

    Thanks a lot for reading my criticism and replying on it!

    I’ve beaten the game since then and wrote much more in-depth criticism of the entire game. I’m actually positively impressed that you did so much considering you had budget for 2 dungeons… and I’m actually surprised to learn that the forest was actually rushed as it’s my favorite dungeon of the game due to its always dark mechanic, maze-like structure, and the wide variety of solutions to that problem (items, weapons, entering as a ghost…).

    Considering the game’s quality, I’m wondering if there would be way to donate extra money beyond the initial 15 dollars tag ; I can’t really use kickstarter and well, said kickstarter is over with anyway.

    Anyway, here is the in-depth criticism:


    First of all, the game’s greatest shortcoming is that it’s, well, short. I can understand the decision, as this is a roguelike and you’re meant to beat it in one sitting… except that the persistence between runs make this a bit problematic. Thanks to the element of persistence and all of the puzzles in the game, obstacles that are problematic when you start from a fresh save become of no importance as you become stronger and unlock more of the game. Likewise, the shortcuts really help you speed along the game, emphasizing the progression (as you don’t lose progress in terms of where you are, stage-wise) However, since the game is so short, by the time you reach a decent level of persistent equipment and finally got a proper feel of the game, the game is already over.

    And that’s a shame ; by the time the game start to get really hard and all of your runs finally pay off, the game is already over.

    Now for criticism on actual game elements. I’ll go chronologically in terms of when they’re encountered. If any fellow fans have not beaten the game, be aware that this post will contain spoilers.

    I admit that I wish the intro stage would have a different feel, especially given you play through it once. The music, although good, really didn’t fit the moment ; I feel that something slower and more peaceful would have fit for the first few rooms, with maybe an opportunity to interact with the wizard and his house a bit before the kidnapping event take place, as to help set up the atmosphere and give a feel of the player of Raga’s life pre-kidnapping and why we should care about the wizard beyond “It’s a video game, you need a goal”. I’ve read some posts from the devs on some sites and there’s apparently a full background story about Raga and the wizard and why he walks upright (something about a potion). Why do we see none of this in-game?

    The town works pretty well for what it is. It’s compact and efficient, which is very good for starting the game quickly. Likewise, the initial NPC dialogue that further explain your quest (villagers went to try and rescue the wizard and failed, Raga is the last one who can give a shot at it, no matter how unlikely a hero he is) is good. However, the problem is that the NPC dialogue once you’ve made a few runs take a rather sharp nosedive. Although some have rather interesting and even funny lines (such as the NPC who actually notice and is spooked by Raga being a talking lizard or that other NPC who mention liches in the graveyard), some of the lines didn’t feel exactly fitting of the game’s atmosphere. I also found that the villagers moved around a bit too much and had a iffy collision detection for talking ; once you rescue a sizeable amount of them, it become awkward to try and talk to the one you want to talk to. Given that their lines is half of the reward for rescuing them (the other being the money they give you), I think this could use improvements. Oh and by the way, the fact that Raga has an unique animation to sleep in the tavern and the ability to play kick ball with the villagers in the main lobby are very nice touches that help give personality to the main character. So kuddos for those little details.

    Regarding the museum, I have not much negative to say about it. Though I have a few suggestions for it: some sections should be walled off at the start of the game as to not give spoilers via hidden sections. As it stand, you can take a solid guess at the game’s content by viewing the look of some of the rooms, in particular the crypt’s bestiary. I also feel that an achievement room would have been nice. I also feel that it would have been nice to have a bit more stats for each of the exhbits (for example, for monsters, indicate not only how many you killed but how many times you were killed by each species, the likes).

    As for the game itself…

    The graveyard is a pretty good first area. It’s not so tough that it will shred you within a few rooms unless you get miraculous drops but until you get a hang of its monster quirks, the enemies can give you a nasty surprise. I liked the owl and werewolf enemies in particular, the former because its incredible speed force you to exploit their AI while the later are the first smart enemies, actively keeping out of your range while attempting to set up a fireball dash at you. The area introduce the basic traps (exploding barrels, spikes) and has shallow graves, which encourage you to take on a more cautious approach instead of rushing ahead. The large grave room is also an excellent introduction to the death mechanic and how to take advantage of both the living and dead state. It also give what is one of the most versatile weapons in the game, thus rewarding you very nicely without making you overpowered.

    The Zombie Overlord is a pretty typical but still nicely designed first boss. He’s nothing too unexpected but he’s still very fun to fight. After the rather easy-ish first area, he’s the game’s first roadblock and pretty much teach you the importance of mobility to stay alive. The way he can corner you if you don’t stay aware of your surroundings and the fact that he teaches you crowd control via summoning zombies repeatedly is very good. An excellent first boss and I really cannot see anything to change with him. He do get significantly easier if you trigger the shallow graves and empty them before he does but I don’t consider this a flaw given he’s the first boss and that I considered this the game rewarding the player for being clever.

    The forest is probably my favorite area in the game. It can be either the main ‘power-up room’ of the game or a meatgrinder that will end your run and this, relying on your level of preparation. The forest is incredibly dark, use a mix of easy and hard foes who don’t reveal their location in the dark, and has an unique trap, the beartrap, which is very hard to see and does massive damage when triggered. It pose a very interesting challenge that really take advantage of the game’s mechanics, with many solutions as to clear it. The obvious one is to buy a lantern or a blue candle and move slowly but the game’s lighting mechanic allow the player to find alternate solutions. Both Arthur’s Lance and the Golden Axe emit a halo of light as they’re thrown, allowing the player to use them to locate hidden traps and enemies. You can also choose to forego Raga’s life and trek through the forest as a ghost (though you forfeit the safety net of having an extra 100 HPs should you die).

    Being very large and due to its unique challenge, the forest significantly lengthen the game and reward the player significantly for being clever, with a very high drop rate for items. The only really bad thing about it is the boss… or rather, lack thereof. Every other area got a boss but the forest end with an admitely tricky and very clever werewolf ambush but compared to the Zombie Overlord or the later bosses, a simple enemy rush is very disappointing. I’d have expected something like a giant carnivorous plant or maybe a super werewolf or maybe even a zombie dragon.

    The sewers is where the difficulty pick up. It’s nothing overly overwhelming but while being cautious was simply a good idea in the graveyard, it is vital in this stage. Rushing and careless firing can result in being overwhelmed by spiders and slimes, and likewise not paying attention to the floating eyes can result in the run ending very quickly. The sewers also introduce a mid-boss (the Slime Crystal) and a new puzzle (involving a grate and a gelatin cube enemy). The stage is overly very well done and I like many of the rooms it has to throw at players.

    The sewers’ boss, the Sewer Hag, is however rather weak. Though she is suitably challenging at first, the over-reliance of the battle’s difficulty on the spawning mushrooms and the leaking pipes is a bit bothersome. I expected the hag to have more bullet patterns and maybe spells to throw at the player but instead, she only attack through the same pattern. This makes the battle extremely tense the first few times but she end up as the most formulaic and in fact, easiest boss once you get her. I just feel that the fight would benefit greatly from the hag herself having more attacks than just the spread shot (or at least, vary it up so she isn’t so predictable).

    The second hidden area, the Den of Thieves, is another stage I really like. The stage has no normal enemies and instead rely on clever placements of traps. While the game reward a slow approach, the Den of Thieves take it to the logical conclusion through its emphasis on traps. Every room that isn’t inhabited by a merchant is a puzzle that demand you navigate it into a certain way and/or trigger traps in a certain order to clear them without damage. It’s an excellent idea and the stage is short enough that it isn’t too exhausting. The tendency of barrels and torches to contain bombs also force you to think twice before throwing weapons around (though again, it can be exploited to solve some of the rooms). My only real criticism is that the stage should have included some unique traps to fit the theme and vary the puzzles further. Maybe boulders/steel balls that roll around in small circuits repeatedly, forcing you to navigate through them with good timing? Or maybe pressure pads that close walls or activate traps if you step on them? Graphically, I think it would be interesting if the merchants in this stage used different skins, as to emphasize that they’re thieves, not normal merchants.

    The boss of the Den of Thieves is not something I expected. By that, I meant that I expected to fight a bandit leader or an assassin dispatched by Death instead of a zombified merchant. I guess it’s technically mostly the same but still, pointing it out. Regarding his combat pattern, he’s a beefed up beserk merchant, which is fine given beserk merchants are tough. For those who are not in the habit of killing merchants, he’s actually an opportunity to get a feel of them and that’s fine. Still, I think it would be interesting if he sometimes charged at the player or varied the way he moved around the room as to prevent the player getting complacent. Likewise, I think it would help make him different from angered merchants if he was able to use more weapons than just the axe (maybe some spreadshots using the daggers or him rapid-firing Swords in the player’s direction?). He’s definitely a better boss than the Sewer Hag and is more akin to the Zombie Overlord in quality but I feel that for a boss that come so late, he could use being less predictable.

    The final area, the crypt, is pretty well-designed as well. Its level design is very good and I love many of the Zelda-esque rooms with the retractable spikes that force you to think before moving but to do so quickly once you do. Enemies are noticeably harder and have much more complex patterns, demanding good reflexes and planning. The ogres and deminions in particular can easily overwhelm you if you’re reckless. The Arrow traps, encountered for the first time if you did not find the Den of Thieves, also encourage you to think before stepping too deep into a room. In terms of pure level design, this is definitely the best level in the game and the high difficulty really make all that equipment you got from your run and previous runs worth it.

    Death is a bit of a paradox. As a boss, he is a fantastic one. As a final boss, he is pathetic. I will explain why now. Death has a pretty interesting and very clever set of mechanics to his fight. He will teleport accross the room and telegraph a large arsenal of moves in different ways. If he simply teleport, he will throw a single sickle in Raga’s direction, but if he teleport near his throne, he will draw a magic circle. The lines on the circle indicate in what direction the spread of bouncing scythes he will fire will fly. Alternatively, he can unleash a swirl of projectiles. The aura around Death show what element his projectiles will be and what ring the player should wear to counter it, with both rings given in the room. The clever part of the battle and one I found brillant in retrospective is that on your first few attempts, Death will most probably telefrag you (teleport into you to kill you). His teleportation is not random ; if the player remember the saying “You can’t run from Death”, his pattern suddenly make sense. Your foe is Death, so he will always teleport in your path wherever you go. To not be telefragged, you must stop running and let him catch you. Then you slip out of the way when he’s about to fire off his scythes.

    This makes for a very good fight and one with a very clever twist (though I wish that somewhere in the crypt, there would be a room with the saying on a tablet or something, as to hint players to the solution). The big problem is that although Death is very challenging fight demanding a clever solution, once you’ve beaten him… that’s it. There is no second form and Death does not get a second wind or a ‘beserk mode’ at low HP. Once you’ve figured him out, he’s a great challenging boss… but absolutely not final boss material. Once I beat him, I stood there for a good few seconds, seriously expecting Death to have a second form. I was severely disappointed when he did not have one.

    Then I rescued the wizard and I expected maybe a twist or a true final stage… but nope. Death is, again, a great boss. But I feel he’s not a good final boss.

    The ending is unfortunately extremely bad. I did not expect a giant cutscene or an epic montage but I at least expected a text epilogue of the game and then having my final stats for the run displayed. Well, I didn’t get even that. The wizard’s reaction to being rescued is unfortunately very anticlimatic and the credits sequence, although it has fitting music, has an awkward choice for its background. Likewise, the game doesn’t aknowledge whenever Raga survived the journey or not. I was also extremely disappointed that although the game give you your final stats if you fail, it doesn’t if you win.

    Since this is an element where I felt the game faltered, I will thus give more substantial suggestions. First, I think the wizard should be more shocked that Raga arrived and be more relieved that the ordeal is over with. If Raga is alive, have the wizard be shocked but relieved to finally be freed. Then he rationalize that Raga must have been very worried and really is loyal for him to brave Death, literally, to find him. He tells him that everything will be fine and they escape the crypt together. A text epilogue would probably detail on how the wizard completed his potion (or not) and on how Death’s humilating defeat has made him rethink his attitude toward mortals. The villagers wishes to hail Raga as their hero but our hero doesn’t really care about that ; he’s just happy being reunited with his master and returning to his carefree familiar lifestyle. If Raga is a ghost, the wizard wonder if he is hallucinating his familiar’s image in a desesperate attempt to forget about the predicament he is in. Raga leads the wizard out but stay behind in the crypt. Death appears before Raga and finally figure that Raga was merely fighting to protect those he loved. In exchange for not revealing to everybody that he beat him, Death will leave the wizard alone and allow Raga to pass on to his final rest despite their dispute. Text epilogue again about how the wizard completed his potion (or not) and how, out of gratitude for Raga saving them, the villagers recovered his corpse from Death’s domain and gave him a decent burial.

    Those ending ideas would be just a matter of a bit of extra text in the game and maybe a fork to check if Raga is alive or a ghost when he talk to the wizard so I don’t think they’d be too hard to implement. Mostly, I think it would be a better conclusion to the game than the current ending to the game.

    As mentionned above, I also think that the credits could have a different picture. Or maybe just have images of each of the game’s areas in the background as the credits sequence progress. Oh and why do we get our final stats when we lose but not if we win?

    Regarding the game’s main drawback, namely its length, I think that the game could use a larger amount of areas. In line with the game’s nature as a roguelike, I believe that they wouldn’t necessarely need to be too many but I think that extra hidden areas would be nice, to add variety and give more choice. In particular, I think it would be interesting to have sections or new stages that can only be entered if Raga is alive or dead. In particular, an underwater cavern stage only available as a ghost, catacombs with an emphasis on tight corridors, or maybe a prison stage with large amounts of objects and doors that can be interacted with through pressure pads or keys. An asylum/abandonned Church/temple filled with anti-ghost wards that can only be entered when alive might be nice too. I also think that the game’s ending could be pushed back a bit ; the OST reveal that the game got an unused final stage BGM. Unless I missed a true ending path somehow, I think it would be nice if there was some kind of ‘Realm of the Dead’ or ‘Necropolis’ stage after the crypt where you have a second, sequential fight with Death (namely, revealing that although Death did wait for Raga in the crypt, he actually hid the wizard deeper, in his own domain).

    The idea of alternate stages is one of the game’s best points and already lengthen the game nicely. I think that one extra main stage and more hidden areas would go a long way as to make the game feel less abrupt.

    I also feel that extra areas would be better if the devs intend to increase the difficulty ; the graveyard, sewers, and crypt have a nice, logical difficulty curve. If the game has to have extra difficulty, I think it should be concentrated into a fourth stage. In particular, the free move + free fire mechanic could make for some really frantic battles and I feel that having a stage where you have large quantities of enemies who mob after you while being tougher than zombies could make for some really great moments and help make it different from the crypt (crypt included single, tough enemies who waited for you. Fourth stage would include aggressive, fast mobs who rush you).

    My final suggestion is technically a bit of nitpick but as death is very frequent and sometimes even necessary, I feel it might be nice if the character had different death animation if he dies as a ghost and having the game actually note what did Raga in when you get your final stats. For example, instead of falling over when he dies as a ghost, his entire body is reduced to a ethereal skeleton and then when he tries to keep going anyway, he collapses and desintegrate to dust (showing that he can’t cheat death twice). Alternatively, he falls down like he does in the game right now but instead of fading right away, Death’s hand emerge from underneath him and drags him under. As for the ‘game aknowledge how you died’ part, simply having short lines about Raga’s final state (death by zombie: Raga got his brains eaten. Death by spikes: Raga became an iguana-on-a-stick. Death by maneater plant: Raga became plant food.). I also think it would be nice to have a board in either the village or museum that keep track of how far your best runs went (until you beat the game, at which point it count which runs were the fastest).

    In fact, I think that the death animation is a bit too fast ; it’s fine for when Raga becomes a ghost as it allow the game to flow rapidly but since the game is over and you have to restart when Raga dies as a ghost, I think the animation could at least be a bit slower and dramatic, or at least have Raga not fade out so quickly. Right now, the game kick you to the game over so fast it barely register that Raga does have a death animation. Again, I can understand why making it so quick for alive deaths (to keep the game’s rythm) but the ghost death animation could use to be a bit slower. If the death was just a bit slower but remained the same, I wouldn’t have a problem with it ; it just feels weird to be booted so quickly to the game over screen when you fail.


    That’s my in-depth criticism in particular. Hope it helps further. Again, you have done a really nice game and frankly, that it feels too short is actually a good sign to me ; it is to me the proof that the game is good enough that when you finish it, you’re still wanting more. I definitely look forward to further updates.


  • LDG

    Thanks a lot for reading my criticism and replying on it!

    My pleasure! Really appreciate you taking the time :)

    Considering the game’s quality, I’m wondering if there would be way to donate extra money beyond the initial 15 dollars tag ; I can’t really use kickstarter and well, said kickstarter is over with anyway.

    That’s very kind of you! There is a way to increase the amount of a Humble purchase (on the widget, next to “$14.99” you can press the “+”). I’m not sure if you can add to a purchase once it’s already been made. Either way, really appreciate it!

    First of all, the game’s greatest shortcoming is that it’s, well, short

    Definitely agreed, we’ll be adding more content this summer.

    Why do we see none of this in-game?

    Honestly it’s because of budget restrictions. We’re only two guys and we have to focus on the meat of the game. Time spent on the introduction and ending is towards content that most gamers will likely breeze through and only see once. I’d love to spend more time on these parts but we’re just too thinly stretched ATM. Feel free to ping @joshuamorse to see if he’ll make more music for the game ;)

    some of the lines didn’t feel exactly fitting of the game’s atmosphere … So kuddos for those little details.

    That’s probably because some of the dialog was written by forum users ;) Agreed it feels kind of scattered. Thanks for the kudos!

    I also feel that an achievement room would have been nice.

    You’ll be glad to hear that we’re planning to make that soon!

    The graveyard is a pretty good first area.

    Great to hear, thanks for the notes!

    The forest is probably my favorite area in the game.…a giant carnivorous plant

    That’s exactly what we have planned! https://twitter.com/richtaur/status/428385557329096704/photo/1

    The sewers’ boss, the Sewer Hag, is however rather weak. I just feel that the fight would benefit greatly from the hag herself having more attacks

    We’re going to add multiple types of mushrooms and give her various patterns. Should be fun!

    The second hidden area, the Den of Thieves, is another stage I really like. My only real criticism is that the stage should have included some unique traps to fit the theme and vary the puzzles further.

    @geoffb has prototyped some really cool stepping-tile puzzles that we’ll add to the Den. Definitely agreed the Den needs more unique traps.

    The boss of the Den of Thieves is not something I expected.

    I have completely redone how merchants/zombie merchants behave. Previously they walked in a square shape around the player, and in the next update they instead charge the player and revolve around in circles. It’s really challenging, hope you dig it :)

    The final area, the crypt, is pretty well-designed as well. Its level design is very good and I love many of the Zelda-esque rooms with the retractable spikes that force you to think before moving but to do so quickly once you do. Enemies are noticeably harder and have much more complex patterns, demanding good reflexes and planning. The ogres and deminions in particular can easily overwhelm you if you’re reckless. The Arrow traps, encountered for the first time if you did not find the Den of Thieves, also encourage you to think before stepping too deep into a room. In terms of pure level design, this is definitely the best level in the game and the high difficulty really make all that equipment you got from your run and previous runs worth it.

    Death is a bit of a paradox. As a boss, he is a fantastic one. As a final boss, he is pathetic. I was severely disappointed when he did not have one.

    Sorry about that, and agreed! He’s not epic enough, doesn’t really feel like a “last” boss. We’ll work on it.

    The ending is unfortunately extremely bad. I was also extremely disappointed that although the game give you your final stats if you fail, it doesn’t if you win. Those ending ideas…

    Yeah this is again us running out of time, sorry. Especially agreed on the stats, we’ll look into that.

    The idea of alternate stages is one of the game’s best points and already lengthen the game nicely. I think that one extra main stage and more hidden areas would go a long way as to make the game feel less abrupt.

    I think you’ll be really happy with the updates later this year :)

    In fact, I think that the death animation is a bit too fast

    Slower and dramatic is a great idea!

    That’s my in-depth criticism in particular. Hope it helps further. Again, you have done a really nice game and frankly, that it feels too short is actually a good sign to me ; it is to me the proof that the game is good enough that when you finish it, you’re still wanting more. I definitely look forward to further updates.

    This is great feedback, thanks so much! I like how varied your feedback is too, you clearly played this game very thoroughly, and that’s totally appreciated :) I can’t wait until I get to work on this game again, and I hope you’ll enjoy the updates. I think you will!


  • Patron

    Have nothing to add, just wanted to compliment @mew on really excellent feedback! Multi-faceted, like @richtaur said, which only comes from a deep understanding of the game. Thank you for helping make the game better for the rest of us!


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